Writing about art pdf munsterberg

Pre-history[ edit ] Japanese art since the Heian period — had followed two principal paths: The hand-produced nature of these shikomi-e [b] limited the scale of their production, a limit that was soon overcome by genres that turned to mass-produced woodblock printing. He consolidated his government in the village of Edo modern Tokyo[6] and required the territorial lords to assemble there in alternate years with their entourages. The demands of the growing capital drew many male labourers from the country, so that males came to make up nearly seventy percent of the population.

Writing about art pdf munsterberg

History[ edit ] Plato's forms, the beginning of ekphrasis[ edit ] In the Republic, Book X, Plato discusses forms by using real things, such as a bedfor example, and calls each way a bed has been made, a "bedness".

He commences with the original form of a bed, one of a variety of ways a bed may have been constructed by a craftsman and compares that form with an ideal form of a bed, of a perfect archetype or image in the form of which beds ought to be made, in short, the epitome of bedness.

In his analogy, one bedness form shares its own bedness — with all its shortcomings — with that of the ideal form, or template. A third bedness, too, may share the ideal form. He continues with the fourth form also containing elements of the ideal template or archetype which in this way remains an ever-present and invisible ideal version with which the craftsman compares his work.

As bedness after bedness shares the ideal form and template of all creation of beds, and each bedness is associated with another ad infinitum, it is called an "infinite regress of forms". From form to ekphrasis[ edit ] It was this epitome, this template of the ideal form, that a craftsman or later an artist would try to reconstruct in his attempt to achieve perfection in his work, that was to manifest itself in ekphrasis at a later stage.

writing about art pdf munsterberg

Artists began to use their own literary and artistic genre of art to work and reflect on another art to illuminate what the eye might not see in the original, to elevate it and possibly even surpass it.

Plato and Aristotle[ edit ] For Plato and Aristotleit is not so much the form of each bed that defines bedness: The painter's products stand before us as though they were alive, but if you question them, they maintain a most majestic silence.

It is the same with written words; they seem to talk to you as if they were intelligent, but if you ask them anything about what they say, from a desire to be instructed, they go on telling you just the same thing forever". Ekphrasis is described in Aphthonius ' Progymnasmatahis textbook of styleand later classical literary and rhetorical textbooks, and with other classical literary techniques was keenly revived in the Renaissance.

In the Middle Ages, ekphrasis was less often practiced, especially as regards real objects, and historians of medieval art have complained that the accounts of monastic chronicles recording now vanished art concentrate on objects made from valuable materials or with the status of relicsand rarely give more than the cost and weight of objects, and perhaps a mention of the subject matter of the iconography.

The Renaissance and Baroque periods made much use of ekphrasis. In Spain, Lope de Vega often used allusions and descriptions of Italian art in his plays, and included the painter Titian as one of his characters.

Cervanteswho spent his youth in Italy, utilized many Renaissance frescoes and paintings in Don Quixote and many of his other works. In England, Shakespeare briefly describes a group of erotic paintings in Cymbelinebut his most extended exercise is a line description of the Greek army before Troy in The Rape of Lucrece.

Ekphrasis seems to have been less common in France during these periods. Herman Melville's Moby Dickor The Whale features an intense use of ekphrasis as a stylistic manifesto of the book in which it appears. In the chapter "The Spouter Inn", a painting hanging on the wall of a whaler's inn is described as irreconcilably unclear, overscrawled with smoke and defacements.

The narrator, so-called Ishmael, describes how this painting can be both lacking any definition and still provoking in the viewer dozens of distinct possible understandings, until the great mass of interpretations resolves into a Whale, which grounds all the interpretations while containing them, an indication of how Melville sees his own book unfolding around this chapter.

In Ibsen 's work The Lady from the Seathe first act begins with the description of a painting of a mermaid dying on the shore and is followed by a description of a sculpture that depicts a woman having a nightmare of an ex-lover returning to her. Both works of art can be interpreted as having much importance in the overall meaning of the play as protagonist Ellida Wangel both yearns for her lost youth spent on an island out at sea and is later in the play visited by a lover she thought dead.

Furthermore, as an interesting example of the back-and-forth dynamic that exists between literary ekphrasis and art, in eight years after the play was written Norwegian painter Edvard Munch painted an image similar to the one described by Ibsen in a painting he entitled unsurprisingly enough Lady from the Sea.

Ibsen's last work When We Dead Awaken also contains examples of ekphrasis as the play's protagonist, Arnold Rubek, is a sculptor who several times throughout the play describes his masterpiece "Resurrection Day" at length and in the many different forms the sculpture took throughout the stages of its creation.

Once again the evolution of the sculpture as described in the play can be read as a reflection on the transformation undergone by Rubek himself and even as a statement on the progression Ibsen's own plays took as many scholars have read this final play stated by Ibsen himself to be an 'epilogue' as the playwright's reflection on his own work as an artist.

In this novel, the protagonist, Prince Myshkin, sees a painting of a dead Christ in the house of Rogozhin that has a profound effect on him. Later in the novel, another character, Hippolite, describes the painting at much length depicting the image of Christ as one of brutal realism that lacks any beauty or sense of the divine.

Rogozhin, who is himself the owner of the painting, at one moment says that the painting has the power to take away a man's faith, a comment that Dostoyevsky himself made to his wife Anna upon seeing the actual painting that the painting in the novel is based on, The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb by Hans Holbein.

The painting was seen shortly before Dostoyevsky began the novel.Writing About Art was written as the text for a course of the same name required of all art majors at The City College of New York. The book explains the different approaches college students encounter in undergraduate art history classes/5.

Writing About Art - Kindle edition by Marjorie Munsterberg. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Writing About grupobittia.coms: 9. Writing About Art was written as the text for a course of the same name required of all art majors at The City College of New York.

The book explains the different approaches college students encounter in undergraduate art history grupobittia.com: $8. The Essential Vermeer Glossary of Art-Related Terms: D - I. This glossary contains a number of recurrent terms found on the present site which may not be clear to all readers, especially when employed within the context of an art discussion.

Writing About Art was written as the text for a course of the same name required of all art majors at The City College of New York.

The book explains the different approaches college students encounter in undergraduate art history classes. After you are finished, please visit Marjorie Munsterberg’s Writing About Art: “APPENDIX III: Sample Student Papers (Visual Descriptions)” (PDF) to look at examples of student’s visual descriptions of these artworks.

Note that these students wrote several drafts and the teacher’s comments on these drafts are also included on this page.

Undergraduate Writing and Research Advising | Art History & Archaeology